Humpty Dumpty

Humpty Dumpty

 

This summer I was able to slow down and take a break from the daily avalanche of news for a couple of weeks.

I was even able to pause and wonder — with some empathy — about how one becomes a person like the current president of the USA.

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And then I found myself writing a song called “Humpty Dumpty.”

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I reminded myself that our current president was once a newborn baby.

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What happened to him?

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How did he learn so little about empathy?

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How was he treated by his parents and other family members?

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What was it like being sent to a military boarding school at age 13?

Lonely?

Painful?

Challenging?

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If one didn’t already know how to fight, then I suppose that would be
a place to learn how…

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As an adult, his goals seem to have been to make money, become famous,
and acquire power.

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And he certainly has succeeded.

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He has become the center of attention in many different — and increasingly dangerous — ways.

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I deeply and truly hope that the democratic structures which still exist here in the USA are able to withstand the onslaught of his presidency.

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His latest decision to withdraw US troops from Syria — which left our Kurdish allies vulnerable to Turkish military forces — seems particularly misguided and heart-breaking.

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All I can see is deadly ripples spreading from this decision for days and weeks and years to come…

Deep breath in.

Deep breath out.

An impeachment inquiry has begun in the US House of Representatives.

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And last night 12 Democratic presidential candidates participated in a debate about the future of our country — and how our actions ripple around the planet.

Another deep breath in.

And out.

I do believe that folks who commit crimes and who abuse power eventually fall off their proverbial walls…

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This is often the result of tremendously courageous whistleblowers and journalists and editors and lawyers and media organizations.

Recently I heard an extraordinary interview with Ronan Farrow by Terry Gross on the NPR radio program Fresh Air about his most recent book, Catch and Kill.

Among other things, he explains how people — often men — with money and power work together to keep each other’s secrets hidden.

You can click here for a link to a review/explanation of the book if you are curious.

Farrow ends the interview by saying how he remains hopeful even though he has born witness to — and experienced himself directly — intense bullying, surveillance, and threats of retribution during the process of researching and writing his book.

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I end this blog post, as I ended my “Humpty Dumpty” song, with a hope that many of us will remain engaged with our country’s political process and vote in the upcoming election cycle.

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And I remain grateful to the Pixabay website — where I found all of the images used in this blog post.

And to the folks in my ukulele meetup group who liked this song when I played it for them a couple of weeks ago and asked me to make a recording of it.

And to Apple for their wonderful program GarageBand, which is what I used to record it.

And to you for reading and listening to yet another blog post!

THANK YOU.

Can We Slow It Down?

Can We Slow It Down?

 

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Although spring is just arriving here in the greater Boston area, I am deeply aware of how quickly it will pass.

Yesterday I was celebrating the 22 crocus flowers in my front yard.

And today there are only 9…

Someone nibbled the rest of them down to the ground overnight!

I do not begrudge anyone (rabbit? skunk? possum? squirrel? raccoon? rat?) an early spring feast.

But it was a reminder of how life changes… and sometimes much too quickly.

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A couple of weeks ago I was asked by the pianist/songwriter Molly Ruggles to share a few songs during a Sunday morning service at the Unitarian Universalist church in Medford, MA.

It’s a beautiful building — with lots of stained glass windows and gently curving pews — and the congregation is very welcoming.

One of the longstanding members of the church is someone I worked with at my very first job after dropping out of college. He and I have reconnected a little bit in recent years due to a shared interest in music and poetry — and it was a pleasure to see him before and after the service.

The minister, Reverend Marta Valentin, was planning a sermon about the value of observing some sort of Sabbath in one’s life.

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I immediately started thinking about standards which might fit this theme, such as “Up A Lazy River” by Hoagy Carmichael and Sidney Arodin or “Bidin’ My Time” by the Gershwin Brothers.

But it also occurred to me that a couple of my original songs might fit the theme, too.

With some shyness, I sent them — “Can We Slow It Down” and “The Beauty All Around” — to Molly for consideration.

Much to my delight, she liked them and forwarded them to Reverend Marta, who also liked them.

In fact, Reverend Marta visited my blog and found another original song, “May Your Life Be Blessed,” which she asked us to include in the service.

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Needless to say, I found this entire experience to be a much-needed affirmation that my original songs can be meaningful to people other than myself…

It was also exciting because I had been thinking that I could only perform my original songs in public with Doug Hammer (who is playing in the recording at the top of this page) at the piano with me.

I write songs using a ukulele — which I play very rudimentarily — and then flesh them out with Doug at his recording studio north of Boston. And Doug has performed many of them with me in different showcases during the past few years.

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So it was a revelation that another pianist would be able to bring them to life as well as Molly did (with very little rehearsal)!

The service itself was very satisfying, too.

My songs — especially “Can We Slow It Down?” — almost seemed as though they had been written to complement the Reverend Marta’s sermon.

Hurrah!

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As I have probably noted in previous blog posts, there is a thriving ukulele Meetup community in the greater Boston area.

I attend a group which meets the 2nd and 4th Wednesday night of each month and another which meets the 1st and 3rd Wednesday afternoon of each month.

Most ukulele Meetup groups include a humble — and very supportive — open-mic period where attendees can share a song they’ve been working on.

This is the main place I have dared to share my original songs during the past few years.

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After I played “Can We Slow It Down?” two weeks ago, a couple of fellow ukulele attendees asked me if I might post it somewhere.

So this post is created for them!

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Thank you to Molly Ruggles, Reverend Marta, Doug Hammer, and my ukulele-playing peers for their enthusiastic support and encouragement.

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Thank you to Pixabay for some lovely images.

And thank YOU for reading and listening to another blog post.

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I welcome any thoughts/feelings you might have about the pace of life these days…

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